SURVIVAL GUIDE

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Single Wife Super Bowl Survival

Don’t  be  the  annoying  girl  at  the  party!

Super Bowl parties are a GREAT opportunity to mix and mingle with a few good men! And let’s be honest- NOBODY wants to be the annoying girl at the party who has no clue what’s going on. I’ll admit, I’ve attended a few parties in the past and didn’t even know which teams were playing! So, I decided to collect a few facts to save you the embarrassment LOL!

If you’re going to a house party, it’s a good idea to find out who the house is going for, because it’s a very awkward situation when you’re cheering for the wrong team (You’d be surprised how serious people take this stuff, I had to learn the hard way!!) This year, you have to pick sides, ATL or New England! Check out the football basics below:

For starters, THE GAME COMES ON AT 6:30pm EST and this year’s lineup is between Atlanta and New England with ATL being the underdog.

Terms to know:

  • Down: A period of action that starts when the ball is put into play and ends when the ball is ruled dead (meaning that the play is completed). The offense gets four downs to advance the ball 10 yards. If it fails to do so, it must surrender the ball to the opponent, usually by punting on the fourth down.

  • End zone: A 10-yard-long area at both ends of the field — the promised land for a football player. You score a touchdown when you enter the end zone in control of the football. If you’re tackled in your own end zone while in possession of the football, the other team gets a safety.

  • Extra point: A kick, worth one point, that’s typically attempted after every touchdown (it’s also known as the point after touchdown, or PAT). The ball is placed on either the 2-yard line (NFL) or the 3-yard line (college and high school) and generally is kicked from inside the 10-yard line after being snapped to the holder. It must sail between the uprights and above the crossbar of the goalpost to be considered good.

  • Field goal: A kick, worth three points, that can be attempted from anywhere on the field but usually is attempted within 40 yards of the goalpost. Like an extra point, a kick must sail above the crossbar and between the uprights of the goalpost to be ruled good.

  • Fumble: The act of losing possession of the ball while running with it or being tackled. Members of the offense and defense can recover a fumble. If the defense recovers the fumble, the fumble is called a turnover.

  • Interception: A pass that’s caught by a defensive player, ending the offense’s possession of the ball.

  • Sack: When a defensive player tackles the quarterback behind the line of scrimmage for a loss of yardage.

    The players on the offensive side of the ball include

  • Quarterback: The leader of the team. He calls the plays in the huddle, yells the signals at the line of scrimmage, and receives the ball from the center. Then he hands off the ball to a running back, throws it to a receiver, or runs with it.

  • Center: The player who snaps the ball to the quarterback. He handles the ball on every play.

  • Running back: A player who runs with the football. Running backs are also referred to astailbackshalfbacks, and rushers.

  • Fullback: A player who’s responsible for blocking for the running back and also for pass-blocking to protect the quarterback. Fullbacks, who are generally bigger than running backs, are short-yardage runners.

  • Wide receiver: A player who uses his speed and quickness to elude defenders and catch the football. Teams use as many as two to four wide receivers on every play.

  • Tight end: A player who serves as a receiver and also as a blocker. This player lines up beside the offensive tackle to the right or the left of the quarterback.

  • Left guard and right guard: The inner two members of the offensive line, whose jobs are to block for and protect the quarterback and ball carriers.

  • Left tackle and right tackle: The outer two members of the offensive line.

    The players on the defensive side of the ball include

  • Defensive tackle: The inner two members of the defensive line, whose jobs are to maintain their positions in order to stop a running play or run through a gap in the offensive line to pressure the quarterback or disrupt the backfield formation.

  • Defensive end: The outer two members of the defensive line. Generally, their jobs are to overcome offensive blocking and meet in the backfield, where they combine to tackle the quarterback or ball carrier. On running plays to the outside, they’re responsible for forcing the ball carrier either out of bounds or toward (into) the pursuit of their defensive teammates.

  • Linebacker: These players line up behind the defensive linemen and generally are regarded as the team’s best tacklers. Depending on the formation, most teams employ either three or four linebackers on every play. Linebackers often have the dual role of defending the run and the pass.

  • Safety: The players who line up the deepest in the secondary — the last line of defense. There are free safeties and strong safeties, and they must defend the deep pass and the run.

  • Cornerback: The players who line up on the wide parts of the field, generally opposite the offensive receivers.

    The most important thing you need to remember is that you’re supposed to have fun. Don’t get so caught up in knowing these rules that you forget to enjoy yourself. One thing we know is that men love happy women..so be tons of fun, smile, laugh and flirt! 

    With SO much Love,

    Sig24

wine & cheese soiree

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